Author Topic: How do u use this?  (Read 6967 times)

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Offline lllllllBOB

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How do u use this?
« on: August 09, 2004, 08:22:04 AM »
Hello all.. call me stupid i guess, but how exactly do i use this Tor?

  Use it like a proxy or with a proxy or what?

  I got it loading up... so now what do ya do after it's running?

I don't get the part of the instructions " ( To test if it's working, point your browser to socks4 or socks5 proxy at localhost port 9050 )

Wouldn't that be setting the browser to use a proxy localhost:9050 or 127.0.0.1 :9050?
Then it says: ( It appears you have configured your web browser to use Tor as an HTTP Proxy. This is not correct: Tor provides a SOCKS proxy. Please configure your client accordingly. )

So how do u use it as a socks proxy? like with internet explorer , winmx or something?  i guess im stupid.. lol

Thanks for any help...  .

Offline lllllllBOB

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How do u use this?
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2004, 08:42:27 AM »
Well i be darn... I figured it out... apparently i was stupid.. lol

For internet explorer 6.0
: Click to where you normally would enter info to use a proxy...
  Click Advanced button.
  UNcheck "use the same proxy server for all protocols"
  For the Socks proxy type in ( localhost : port 9050 )
  and erase all the above stuff http,gofer,ftp,and etc.

and now it's surfing through Internet Explorer... theres not much speed loss either. cool.. now it looks like i dont have to go looking for proxy servers no more. lol   and I also checked a bunch of proxy test sites, and all passed without showing my ip or knowing it was even a proxy.

I'll try it with some p2p apps later...

Offline Markus

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How do u use this?
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2004, 09:33:33 AM »
Quote from: lllllllBOB
I'll try it with some p2p apps later...


I was playing around with eMule and Tor and it seems that it works... \:D/


Cheers,
Markus

Offline Nemo

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How do u use this?
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2004, 11:07:02 AM »
Quote from: Markus
I was playing around with eMule and Tor and it seems that it works... \:D/

So there are other Tor users which provides gateways to the Internet? Cool!
(let's hope these nice people don't get in trouble because of transfering sensible data of other Tor users between Tor and the Internet... :-( )

About SOCKS: Here's a description of this protocol:

Source: http://archive.socks.permeo.com/protocol/socks4.protocol
[code:1]
SOCKS was originally developed by David Koblas and subsequently modified
and extended by me to its current running version -- version 4. It is a
protocol that relays TCP sessions at a firewall host to allow application
users transparent access across the firewall. Because the protocol is
independent of application protocols, it can be (and has been) used for
many different services, such as telnet, ftp, finger, whois, gopher, WWW,
etc. Access control can be applied at the beginning of each TCP session;
thereafter the server simply relays the data between the client and the
application server, incurring minimum processing overhead. Since SOCKS
never has to know anything about the application protocol, it should also
be easy for it to accommodate applications which use encryption to protect
their traffic from nosey snoopers.

Two operations are defined: CONNECT and BIND.

1) CONNECT

The client connects to the SOCKS server and sends a CONNECT request when
it wants to establish a connection to an application server. The client
includes in the request packet the IP address and the port number of the
destination host, and userid, in the following format.
[...]

2) BIND

The client connects to the SOCKS server and sends a BIND request when
it wants to prepare for an inbound connection from an application server.
This should only happen after a primary connection to the application
server has been established with a CONNECT.

[...]

The purpose of SOCKS BIND operation is to support such a sequence
but using a socket on the SOCKS server rather than on the client.

The client includes in the request packet the IP address of the
application server, the destination port used in the primary connection,
and the userid.
[/code:1]

For using a SOCKS proxy every application needs built in SOCKS support. It seems that eMule has SOCKS support. But many other programs don't have it. You can't use these programs with Tor... :-(
(Does a program exist which supports SOCKS and does portforwarding and listening on ports?!? It would work if there exists such a gateway program..)

The advantages of SOCKS: No more manually setting portforwarding rules on the firewall/router for accepting incoming conections (BIND-mode in SOCKS solves that).

There's another solution for automatic firewall changing: uPnP. It's not widespread, but IMO in future it will be more used. SOCKS is rather old and not really widespread.

Greetings,
Nemo.

Offline Markus

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How do u use this?
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2004, 06:25:50 PM »
Quote from: Nemo
Quote from: Markus
I was playing around with eMule and Tor and it seems that it works... \:D/

So there are other Tor users which provides gateways to the Internet? Cool!
(let's hope these nice people don't get in trouble because of transfering sensible data of other Tor users between Tor and the Internet... :-( )

According to my log files there are a couple of Tor routers and I was really surprised how easy it was to set up Tor (ok, I am using Debian) :mrgreen:

I think I am going to play a little bit more with Tor because it really amazing and I want to learn more about it...


Cheers,
Markus

Offline Nemo

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Usage of Tor with any TCP/IP application
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2004, 07:48:41 PM »
Quote from: Nemo
(Does a program exist which supports SOCKS and does portforwarding and listening on ports?!? It would work if there exists such a gateway program..)

There exist such programs!!

From http://www.freehaven.net/tor/doc/tor-doc.html
Quote

You might want to use Tor with an application that doesn't support socks directly. In this case, you should look at using tsocks (http://tsocks.sourceforge.net/) to dynamically replace the system calls in your program to route through Tor. If you want to use socks4a, consider using socat(http://www.dest-unreach.org/socat/) (specific instructions are on this hidden service url http://6sxoyfb3h2nvok2d.onion/tor/SocatHelp]).

Greetings,
Nemo.

Offline lllllllBOB

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How do u use this?
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2004, 03:08:14 AM »
Quote
let's hope these nice people don't get in trouble because of transfering sensible data of other Tor users between Tor and the Internet... :-( )


That's what I was wandering about.
Do Tor servers log your ip connection request and such? Or is nothing logged from the server?  If it does log, then how exactly would that be annoymous?  Looks like the riaa or what have ya would get the tor server ip, then hound them untill they give up your ip. Thus , not very annoymous.

Say I was running a server... you connected and downloaded an mp3 from the riaa... your ip is logged in my tor server... riaa hounds me untill i say it was such and such ip at such and such time that connected...
So that wouldn't be to much annoymous. more like a little more hassle of finding out who it really was.  Anyone else have an opinion on this?
Looks like it would be equivelent to using a reqular old proxy to me.
exept that it connects to different ones upon every request.

and fyi : it works with winmx to.

Offline Markus

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How do u use this?
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2004, 06:37:20 AM »
@lllllllBOB:

I think a lot of your questions are answered in this document. Since I am too lazy to copy & paste the most important passages you have to read it yourself 8)


Cheers,
Markus

Offline Nemo

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My opinion about Tor's anonymity
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2004, 11:29:48 AM »
Quote from: lllllllBOB
Do Tor servers log your ip connection request and such? Or is nothing logged from the server?  If it does log, then how exactly would that be annoymous?  Looks like the riaa or what have ya would get the tor server ip, then hound them untill they give up your ip. Thus , not very annoymous.

I don't really know Tor. These explanations are based on my opinion and my experience with MUTE, Freenet and Entropy.  :oops:

One case: server in Internet, client in Tor:
[code:1]
Web browser via SOCKS <-> SOCKS server integrated into Tor client <-> Tor server <-> .... other Tor servers ... <-> Tor server or client with Internet gateway <-> Webserver on Internet[/code:1]
All activities on Tor are anonymous, because the visible connections over the Internet can't show the real network connections on Tor. When you have connections over the Internet to three other Tor nodes, then nobody can say, what you transfer to which Tor node.
But the Gateway owner's IP is in the Webserver's logfile. All data between this Gateway and the Internet services are unprotected! IMO these people risk much things! They pay for actions of other Tor users... :-(

Other case: network service client and server in Tor (e.g. news, eMail, web, game, ...) :
[code:1]
network client <-> SOCKS server in Tor client or server <-> ... other Tor servers... <-> Tor client or server (with SOCKS server?) <-> network server[/code:1]
The connection between network client and network server is hidden in the Tor network. I think the network server has only log entries of it's own IP (localhost, 127.0.0.1). I don't believe that there were entries of the other Tor address (XYZ.onion).

I don't think it's possible to use a lot of network programs over Tor. A problem is the name resolution of the XYZ.onion hostnames. Many software need a proper name resolution (normal and reversed) to work correctly; perhaps an anonymous eMail system on Tor has problems. Here they write about this problems:
http://freehaven.net/tor/cvs/doc/CLIENTS

Greetings,
Nemo.