Author Topic: Anonymous P2P in Work Place and University | Websense bypass|Web proxy avoidance  (Read 38978 times)

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Offline ezzye

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As an experiment I tried to use kerjodando p2p file sharing client in my work place behind the firewall and a websense proxy.

A difficult environment for p2p file sharing similar to that faced by many university students.

Kerjodando p2p (an ANts p2p mod originally developed by Italian student Gwren, Roberto Rossi) connected and I could upload and download files.

Moreover the connection was secure, encrypted and "anonymous" (friend to friend so IP address hidden as file location not linked to IP address as in ordinary file sharing applications).

Generally, to connect to a p2p file sharing network you need to meet three conditions:

   1. Your IP address needs to be externally visible to the internet
   2. You need an open communications port
   3. You need access to the internet to upload and download

Kerjodando p2p met these three contions as follows:

   1. When you click on a swarm "start" link at the swarm index site http://www.itsdargens.com/ the p2p client automatically downloads and sets up your external IP address even if you're behid a firewall, NAT or proxy.

   2. Kerjodando p2p spoofs SSL and uses port 443. So if you can surf the internet then it will connect and you can file share. Port 80 and 443 are used for web surfing.

   3. Again if you can surf the internet via a browser you can file share. You just need to set-up kerjodando p2p in the same way that the browser was set-up. In my case I looked in the Options|Advanced|connections and found the proxy port and address. I then entered these into kerjodando's proxy setting.

The great thing about this is that while you're file sharing it looks like you either using VOIP, SSL FTP or a secure connection to a website.

So all those students at Zeropaid.com who think that they have been locked out of file sharing now can do it in a secure way.

I am currently testing kerjodando p2p on this page http://www.itsdargens.com/swarm/show_one/66e9b69841ab84096cd197c88419cec3 click START KERJODANDO to download the Java client and connect to the test swarm.

You can also set up your own swarms to test.

There is no need to register or log in to use this website.

see http://kerjodando.blogspot.com/

Offline Markus

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As an experiment I tried to use kerjodando p2p file sharing client in my work place behind the firewall and a websense proxy.
I never ever would do this (not even as an experiment or a test!) in the company I work for because I like my job and donīt want to be

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Kerjodando p2p met these three contions as follows:

   1. When you click on a swarm "start" link at the swarm index site http://www.itsdargens.com/ the p2p client automatically downloads and sets up your external IP address even if you're behid a firewall, NAT or proxy.
I donīt like the idea that an unknown peace of software is being downloaded and executed on my computer.

Quote
   2. Kerjodando p2p spoofs SSL and uses port 443. So if you can surf the internet then it will connect and you can file share. Port 80 and 443 are used for web surfing.
Sure, SSL spoofing is a nice feature, but most home users have control over their routers and are able to set up port forwarding if it is necessary. The only environment where SSL spoofing makes sense for me is behind a very restrictive firewall on a campus or in a corporate network. And to be honest: if someone tries to participate on p2p networks in a corporate network he deserves to be kicked for stupidity.

Quote
The great thing about this is that while you're file sharing it looks like you either using VOIP, SSL FTP or a secure connection to a website.
Sure, this might work. However, I never would recommend to mess with network admins in a corporate network. I am pretty sure that there are a lot of admins who are not dumb-asses and are able to recognize whatīs going on.

Just my 2 cents.




Cheers,
Markus

Offline ezzye

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Thanks for your comments.

They are cool with this where I work and I only did this as a test.

I would never recommend that anyone uses p2p file sharing at work unless it is specifically allowed.

However, back in the days of Napster not only did we use Napster at work but we played the mp3s through our speakers so that we could listen to music while we worked   ;D

And your point about downloading unknown software on to your computer makes no sense as all software is unknown until you know it!

Also, I guess from your reply that you are not at University or in China like some of my friends.

Kerjodando is not for everyone it is for a niche that wants to share files with their friends and their friend's friends with some deniability.

Anyway I will keep working on it despite the mostly negative and hostile comments I've received  :'(

Ez

Offline cautious newn

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ezzye,
thank you for your work on bypassing network administration;  currently it only restricts the information flow and transfer of corporate and academic networks, but speaking from several months of experience, it works.  Therefore I expect it to be expanded into residential chokepoints (ISPs etc.) in the near future, say five to ten years.
  I think it _is_ very important that software is developed which can bypass these controls; I have not personally tried your project's, ANts, but philosophically I must extend a heartfelt thank you, and keep up the good work.
Sincerely, cautious newn

Offline spikeinin

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The abundant affair about this is that while you're book administration it looks like you either application VOIP, SSL FTP or a defended affiliation to a website.


« Last Edit: August 05, 2009, 10:38:39 AM by Markus »